SanctiFusion

Life, the Universe, and Everything, from the Outside In

Pearls Big Enough to Walk Through!

with 7 comments

[Picking up from “Eternal Candyland’ (below):]
We read in Acts that Paul’s gospel was that “that we must through much tribulation enter into the kingdom of God.” A pearl only comes from patiently dealing with trouble. A piece of grit gets up under a clam’s neck and troubles it, and the way the clam deals with the trouble produces something of lasting beauty and value. In order to get into that city, to see Christ, it will take perseverance. In fact, in we read that God, “will give eternal life to those who persist in doing good, seeking after the glory and honor and immortality that God offers. But he will pour out his anger and wrath on those who live for themselves…” Jesus said, “The gate is narrow and the way is hard that leads to (eternal) life, and those who find it are few.” So those that see those gates of pearl will be the ones that know what the pearl is all about.

At about this point, some will be asking if we’re talking about our own hard work saving us, or impressing God so much he’ll just have to let us in. Short answer- not even a little bit. Come back for the next installment to see what kind of road we’ve got for the journey!

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Written by Robert Easter

Tuesday, 25 March, 2008 at 23:00

7 Responses

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  1. A sign of being saved by grace through faith, is good works. Ephesians 2:8-10. James 2:17, faith without works is dead.

    thekingpin68

    Wednesday, 26 March, 2008 at 20:43

  2. And thus putting the onus on us to exercise the faith given us. If we have the faith to choose for Jesus, whom we do not see, is it too much to choose against the sin which we do? Or is there a difference? What is really in that picture of “choosing Jesus?” All the growth and blessing he offers? If not, then how is it we accept the giver and “pass” on the gift, the very purpose of his coming?

    Robert

    Friday, 28 March, 2008 at 14:23

  3. Once we are regenerated we have the ability to do good works. Calvin and Luther discuss this idea. Calvin reasons there will always be a taint of sin, and so these works in Christ will not compare to works we commit in the culminated Kingdom. To have good works in this life, is in a sense, another aspect of God’s grace.

    Cheers my friend.

    Russ:)

    thekingpin68

    Thursday, 3 April, 2008 at 20:26

  4. That’s true, for beforehand all “good” we can do is done from a rebellious heart, which is no praise to God. However, one question two ways: Why is it necessary for that “taint” to remain, and on what authourity can we say that that inward sin is exempt from the promise, in the here and now, that, “The blood of Jesus Christ cleanses us from all sin?” Do we presume that God is not willing or able to give us the (promised) victory, or is the Word of God “yea and nay” on this one point?

    Robert

    Thursday, 3 April, 2008 at 20:46

  5. God could remove the taint now, but I do not see the Biblical evidence for it.

    It can be reasoned by the NT overall that the taint is removed upon the resurrection for our entire being, and our spirit upon death. 1 John 1 and Romans 7 indicate that our sin nature and sinful choices are not obliterated, despite the fact the blood of Christ cleanses us. This is applied to us in this life, and culminates in the next.

    The fact we sin is also a very good point against hard deterministic views of some within Reform theology. Irresistible grace does not obliterate human opposition.

    The results of Christ’s work culminate in the next life.

    Sorry, need to go, I have been typing much today with all this Google ad stuff.

    Thanks for being a friend, Robert. Please enjoy the trip.

    I need some blog comments too.:)

    Russ:)

    thekingpin68

    Friday, 4 April, 2008 at 0:23

  6. The resurrection theory is interesting, based, I guess, on the Christus Victor model of the Atonement, but beyond that, when God says, “Love the Lord ..with all your heart,” is that just a figure of speech? When John writes, “the blood of Jesus Christ ..cleanses us from all sin,” does that leave room for exceptions? If Paul was just talking about a presumed, future, “done deal” when he prayed that the saints be “sanctified wholly,” then why did he even bring it up, much less make it a point to both pray for it and encourage them to desire it?

    I have to offer that Romans 7 speaks of an incorrigible human nature in the Believer only if you expect that meaning to the point of ignoring everything said up to that point, and afterward, about being freed from sin’s influence. God’s plan for the Church is not to be semi-willing hostages until “freed” by death (which the Bible calls our enemy) but to perfectly love Him with no reservation, “being mad partakers of the divine nature!”

    Robert

    Friday, 4 April, 2008 at 8:18

  7. Hello my friend.

    The resurrection theory is interesting, based, I guess, on the Christus Victor model of the Atonement, but beyond that, when God says, “Love the Lord ..with all your heart,” is that just a figure of speech?

    It is not from a ransom theory only. Robert, from Romans and Galatians, none of us keep all of the law and therefore the commandments. They are still commandments, but we are saved in grace through faith. This does not mean that we should abandon the commandments in this life because of sin.

    When John writes, “the blood of Jesus Christ ..cleanses us from all sin,” does that leave room for exceptions?

    I have answered this already, the atoning work is applied to us now and the results culminated in the future. This is why Paul and John describe the sinful struggle of believers.

    If Paul was just talking about a presumed, future, “done deal” when he prayed that the saints be “sanctified wholly,” then why did he even bring it up, much less make it a point to both pray for it and encourage them to desire it?

    Believers are to be set apart and made holy, but again this is a process. We are still under the curse of sin in our physical body and spirit. We die as sinners.

    From a common sense perspective, I defy you to name me one Christian who does not sin.

    I have to offer that Romans 7 speaks of an incorrigible human nature in the Believer only if you expect that meaning to the point of ignoring everything said up to that point, and afterward, about being freed from sin’s influence.

    No, in 7:25 Paul thanks the Lord he is serving the Lord, but on the other hand he is serving the flesh and the law.

    Chapter 8 deals with the idea of being lead by the spirit and putting aside the flesh. This is a spiritual struggle. In regard to Chapter 8, Mounce writes that we are free from the unfavourable verdict from sin. He explains that Paul stated Christians are not under the control of sin nature, but God’s spirit. Mounce notes that holiness is the standard and goal of Christians, and their destiny. This points to the resurrection.

    God’s plan for the Church is not to be semi-willing hostages until “freed” by death (which the Bible calls our enemy) but to perfectly love Him with no reservation, “being mad partakers of the divine nature!”

    Partakers, but not perfect in that, and therefore we shall be raised with a body of honour and not dishonour ( 1 Corinthians 15)

    Thanks for the discussion.:) I just do not have time for a greatly in-depth study where I dig out many commentaries, but I have an understanding of the tradition you are coming from. I believe I have answered well, but am swamped presently.

    Over and out.

    thekingpin68

    Friday, 4 April, 2008 at 14:06


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